Home  |   About Us  |   Wholesale Login  |   What's New  |   Contact Us
A Grow Native! professional tour visits the Alpine Shop located in downtown Kirkwood. The Alpine Shop landscape features native plants supplied by Bohn's Farm and Greenhouses. (Photo credit: Robert Weaver, The Gateway Gardener Magazine)

A Grow Native! professional tour visits the Alpine Shop located in downtown Kirkwood. The Alpine Shop landscape features native plants supplied by Bohn's Farm and Greenhouses. (Photo credit: Robert Weaver, The Gateway Gardener Magazine)

Native Plants

Specializing in Native Plants of the Lower Midwest

Bohn's Farm and Greenhouses strives to produce, within a managed production nursery setting, the most extensive selection of Midwest native perennials found in the lower Midwest.  Our extensive selection of ecotype species and landscape "nativars" are grown in a variety of container sizes to suit the needs of both the landscape professional and the retail merchant.  Special production emphasis in recent years includes native species required for constructing rain gardens, bioswales, and stormwater detention and retension infrastructures according to the "St.Louis County Phase II Stormwater Management Plan" and "Sustainable Practices" adopted by the St. Louis Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD).  

Bohn's Farm wishes to extend a sincere thank you to the Shaw Nature Reserve team for their educational assistance to expand our knowledge of native plants via their educational programs and ongoing development and management of The Whitmire Wildflower Garden

An active member since the inception of the program, Bohn's Farm also values association with the Grow Native! a native plant awareness program jointly managed by the Missori Department of Conservation and Missouri Department of Agriculture

Bohn's Farm RESPONSIBLE CODE OF CONDUCT: All native plants we offer are propagated from seeds responsibly collected or vegetative cuttings from controlled nursery-produced stock plants.  We DO NOT purchase propagated materials from plant material collected in the wild.

View by Product Group: 
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Callirhoe bushii

Poppy Mallow, Bush'S
Cup shaped magenta flowers bloom June through August. Rambling flower stems are more erect than those of the similar C. inbolucrata. Long tap root provides good drought tolerance buts makes transplanting of established plants more difficult.
Callirhoe bushii

Callirhoe involucrata

Poppy Mallow, Purple
Showy, cup-shaped magenta flowers bloom June through frost. Foliage forms trailing stems that forms excellent ground cover or hangs over walls. Drought tolerant.
Callirhoe involucrata

Carex albicans

Sedge, Whitetinge
Carex albicans

Carex amphibola

Sedge, Creek
Compact, clump forming sedge with shiny, semi-evergreen foliage. Vigorous grower. Widely adaptable, preferring dry to moderate moisture conditions. A Midwest native.
Carex amphibola

Carex annectens

Sedge, Yellow Fruited
Missouri Native sedge with attractive yellow flower spikelet's and compact tufts of fine foliage. Flowers form in May, seeds in June. aka C. brachyglossa
Carex annectens

Carex bicknellii

Sedge, Bicknell'S
Carex bicknellii can be found in North America from Eastern half of Canada and south to Kansas. It grows in dry and moist prairies, open woodlands and rocky areas. This Carex tolerates dry locations better than many sedges. It is useful for rain gardens, meadows, and areas where drought-tolerant plants are required. Bicknell’s Sedge grows in tufts of green, narrow, grasslike foliage and spreads by rhizomes. Copper-colored, oval-shaped seedheads appear in late spring giving it one of its common names. Carex bicknellii is named in honor of Eugene Pintard Bicknell (1859-1925), who is known for his keen observations of plant and animal life.
Carex bicknellii

Carex brevior

Sedge, Shortbeak
A common sedge able to grow almost anywhere, most often found in the wild in dry, disturbed areas. Also called Plains Oval Sedge, Shortbeak Sedge actively grows during the spring and fall when soil temperatures are cool like most sedges (cool-season growers). In summer triangular leafy stems rise above low tufts of narrow grass-like foliage. The culms bear prickly green oval spikelets that transition into golden brown seed clusters.Leaf blades are usually about 1’ long and 1/8” wide. The leaf sheaths at the base of each blade has an unusual whitish color and an almost glassy appearance. In late spring multiple leafy culms rise above the foliage to 3-4’. Each culm bears 2-6 oval flower spikes. Each green spikes contain upper pistillate and lower staminate florets. The spikelets are tapered at the base and bluntly pointed at the tip. The flowers transition into reddish brown summer seed spikes. Plants are 1-4’ tall with an equal spread.
Carex brevior

Carex eburnea

Sedge, Bristle-Leaved
Soft, thread-like, green foliage forms a spherical clump. Insignificant whitish-green flowers in April. Occurs naturally in limestone outcrops but also tolerates acid conditions.
Carex eburnea

Carex flaccosperma

Sedge, Blue Wood
Evergreen sedge forms attractive clumps of narrow, blue-green leaves. Thrives in moist conditions but will tolerate drought. An American native groundcover for shade. Greenish-white flower is insignificant.
Carex flaccosperma

Carex frankii

Sedge, Frank'S
Hardy grass-like plant with green foliage. Bristle-like, brown seed heads in May to September. Native to floodplain woodlands. AKA Bristly Cattail Sedge.
Carex frankii

Carex grayi

Sedge, Bur
Attractive, evergreen pleated foliage is lime green in full sun and dark green in part shade. Spiked flowers in May form star-like seed heads. A Midwest native.
Carex grayi

Carex muskingumensis

Sedge, Palm
A dense, clump-forming sedge which is grown for its foliage effect. Produces rigid, erect stems to 20" tall with 8" long, pointed, grass-like, light green leaves radiating from the stem tops. Commonly called palm sedge since the leaves somewhat superficially resemble miniature palm fronds. A Missouri native which is found most often in wooded swamps and on wooded flood plains of rivers. Spread by rhizomes and self-seeding. Insignificant flowers appear in May on terminal spikes which are not showy but are noticeable and of some interest and persist throughout the summer. Foliage promptly turns yellow after frost. Species is named for the Muskingum River in Ohio.
Carex muskingumensis

Carex pensylvanica

Sedge, Pennsylvania
A compact sedge with arching, semi-evergreen, fine-texture foliage. An excellent shade to part shade groundcover. Tolerant of tough urban conditions, especially under trees. An American native.
Carex pensylvanica

Carex radiata

Sedge, Straight-Styled Wood
Fine textured, grass-like, medium green foliage forms a tidy clump. A drought tolerant groundcover for shady sites. A Midwest native.
Carex radiata

Carex shortiana

Sedge, Short'S
Carex shortiana

Carex stricta

Sedge, Tussock
A wetland native that grows in 2-3' tall clumps about 2' wide. As old leaves die, they build up around the living plant, making a "tussock" or little hill. It grows in or near water and spreads by rhizomes.
Carex stricta

Carex vulpinoidea

Sedge, Fox
Missouri native sedge grows on moist open ground in swamps, wet prairies or near water, is one of the most abundant sedges in the state. Foliage consist of narrow grass-like leaf blades. The seed heads, which spray out attractively from the center of the clump, resemble a fox's tail but are short-lived.
Carex vulpinoidea

Cephalanthus occidentalis

Buttonbush
Blooms late June or July.
Cephalanthus occidentalis

Chasmanthium (syn Uniola) latifolium

Grass, Northern River Oats
Upright clumps of bamboo-like foliage. Green foliage turns copper in fall and brown in winter. Attractive flat flower spikes hang down from flowering stems. Prefers light shade and damp locations. Can self-sow.
Chasmanthium (syn Uniola) latifolium

Chelone glabra

Turtlehead
White spike flowers with a tinge of pink appear August through October. Flowers look like a turtle's head. Deep green foliage on upright stems looks good all season. A Midwest native.
Chelone glabra

Conoclinium coelestinum

Mist Flower (Wild Ageratum)
Blooms September through October. (FKA Eupatorium coelestinum)
Conoclinium coelestinum

Coreopsis lanceolata

Coreopsis, Lance-Leaf
Showy, single, gold-yellow flowers on tall stems in May and June.
Coreopsis lanceolata

Coreopsis palmata

Coreopsis, Prairie
Pale yellow flowers--much softer in color than those of our other native coreopsis--are carried on stiff, upright stems for several weeks, beginning in late spring. Spreads by rhizomes and seed, eventually forming large colonies.
Coreopsis palmata

Coreopsis tripteris

Coreopsis, Tall
Coreopsis tripteris

View by Product Group: 
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL