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A Grow Native! professional tour visits the Alpine Shop located in downtown Kirkwood. The Alpine Shop landscape features native plants supplied by Bohn's Farm and Greenhouses. (Photo credit: Robert Weaver, The Gateway Gardener Magazine)

A Grow Native! professional tour visits the Alpine Shop located in downtown Kirkwood. The Alpine Shop landscape features native plants supplied by Bohn's Farm and Greenhouses. (Photo credit: Robert Weaver, The Gateway Gardener Magazine)

Native Plants

Specializing in Native Plants of the Lower Midwest

Bohn's Farm and Greenhouses strives to produce, within a managed production nursery setting, the most extensive selection of Midwest native perennials found in the lower Midwest.  Our extensive selection of ecotype species and landscape "nativars" are grown in a variety of container sizes to suit the needs of both the landscape professional and the retail merchant.  Special production emphasis in recent years includes native species required for constructing rain gardens, bioswales, and stormwater detention and retension infrastructures according to the "St.Louis County Phase II Stormwater Management Plan" and "Sustainable Practices" adopted by the St. Louis Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD).  

Bohn's Farm wishes to extend a sincere thank you to the Shaw Nature Reserve team for their educational assistance to expand our knowledge of native plants via their educational programs and ongoing development and management of The Whitmire Wildflower Garden

An active member since the inception of the program, Bohn's Farm also values association with the Grow Native! a native plant awareness program jointly managed by the Missori Department of Conservation and Missouri Department of Agriculture

Bohn's Farm RESPONSIBLE CODE OF CONDUCT: All native plants we offer are propagated from seeds responsibly collected or vegetative cuttings from controlled nursery-produced stock plants.  We DO NOT purchase propagated materials from plant material collected in the wild.

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Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL

Achillea millefolium

Yarrow
Achillea millefolium, commonly called common yarrow, is a rhizomatous, spreading, upright to mat-forming perennial that is considered by many to be an aggressive weed. Common yarrow from Europe and Asia was originally introduced to America in colonial times, and has since naturalized throughout the U. S. primarily along roadsides, fields, waste areas and lawns. These species plants are noted for producing deeply-dissected, fern-like, aromatic, medium green foliage and tiny, long-lasting, white flowers that appear in dense, flattened, compound corymbs (to 2-4"across) throughout the summer on stems typically rising 2-3’ tall. Foliage has a strong, somewhat spicy aroma that persists when used in dried arrangements.
Achillea millefolium

Acorus calamus

Sweet Flag
Bright green sword-like foliage grows well in moist conditions. Foliage has citrus scent when crushed. Tiny greenish flowers are insignificant. Appreciates protection from hot afternoon sun.
Acorus calamus

Adiantum pedatum

Fern, Northern Maidenhair
Dainty bright green fronds on shiny black stems create a light, airy texture. Spreads by shallow rhizomes to form a dense groundcover . Thrives in moist, loose, rich soil.
Adiantum pedatum

Amorpha fruticosa

False Indigo Bush
Long racemes of purple flower bloom in May and June. Foliage has shrub-like habit and pinnately compound leaves. Grows along stream banks and moist woods.
Amorpha fruticosa

Amsonia illustris

Blue Star, Shining
Clusters of pale blue, star-like flowers grace a substantial mound of shiny, leathery leaves in May. Foliage often turns gold in fall. An easy-care native of the Ozarks.
Amsonia illustris

Amsonia tabernaemontana

Blue Star
Loose clusters of lilac blue star-shaped flowers bloom in May. Willow like leaves turn a stunning shade of yellow-orange in autumn. Drought tolerant. Easy to grow. Midwest native.
Amsonia tabernaemontana

Amsonia tabernaemontana 'Storm Cloud'

Blue Star
Amsonia tabernaemontana, commonly called bluestar, is a Missouri native herbaceous perennial which occurs most frequently in rich, open woods and thickets in the southwestern part of the State. An erect, clump-forming plant which features terminal, pyramidal clusters of 3/4", soft light blue, star-like flowers in late spring atop erect, leafy stems growing 2-3' tall. Narrow, willow-shaped, dull green foliage may turn an attractive yellow in fall. ‘Storm Cloud’ features near black stems in spring clad with silver-veined dark green leaves. Leaves lighten to olive green by summer. Light periwinkle-blue, star-shaped flowers bloom abundantly from late spring to early summer, often with some rebloom thereafter. Plants typically grow to 24-30" tall spreading to as much as 42" wide.
Amsonia tabernaemontana 'Storm Cloud'

Andropogon gerardii

Grass, Big Bluestem
King of native grasses! Blue-green foliage that can reach 8' tall forms distinctive seed heads in late summer. Nice red color in fall. Ideal as a background plant, specimen or in naturalized plantings.
Andropogon gerardii

Aquilegia canadensis

Columbine
Lots of red and yellow nodding flowers for many weeks from late April until mid June. A great source of early nectar for butterflies and hummingbirds. Found naturally on rocky ledges and wooded rocky slopes.
Aquilegia canadensis

Aruncus dioicus

Goat'S Beard
Large wands of frothy, creamy white flowers in May and June. Foliage is similar to astilbe but growth habit is shrub-like. A good native for woodland gardens.
Aruncus dioicus

Asclepias incarnata

Milkweed, Swamp
Clusters of long-lasting vanilla-scented rose-pink flowers are butterfly magnets in July and August. A host plant for Monarch larvae, and a nectar plant for many butterfly species. Grows best in moist soils, but tolerates drier conditions.
Asclepias incarnata

Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella'

Milkweed, Swamp
Large 3-4" clusters of fragrant vanilla-scented rose-pink flowers in July and August over lush green foliage attract butterflies and beneficial insects from midsummer to early fall. Grows best in moist soils but tolerant of drier conditions.
Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella'

Asclepias purpurascens

Milkweed, Purple
Asclepias purpurascens, Purple Milkweed looks similar to Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), but the flower color is a rich red purple color compared to the soft gray-pink of Common Milkweed. There are usually one to three blooms that form near the ends of the stems in late spring, early summer. The flower is held above the leaves on stems a bit longer then Common Milkweed’s and the umbel itself is stiff, and holds a nicely rounded form while that of Common will flop a bit. Blooms can last for about a month and if seed is not set it will occasionally re-bloom. The average height is around 3 feet but it will sometimes go to 4 feet. The flowers will attract a variety of nectar seeking insects from the very small to large Bumble Bees and of course Monarch Butterflies. The leaves are big, around 6-8 inches and they taper to a point at both ends. The mid-vein in the leaves is tinted with the same color as the flower. Grow Asclepias purpurascens in a site that is well drained but has ample moisture. It seems to prefer a bit of shade but will do well in full sun if it gets deep, regular watering. This Milkweed will not spread aggressively like the Common does. The seed pods are smooth and a little more slender than those of Common Milkweed which has plump pods with a prickly surface.
Asclepias purpurascens

Asclepias sullivantii

Milkweed, Sullivant'S
Similar to Common Milkweed but is less aggressive, has slightly smaller flowers, and an overall smooth appearance on the stem, leaves and seed pods. Visited by hummingbirds and a wide variety of bees and butterflies (including, of course, Monarchs), Prairie Milkweed is one of the plants favored by the larvae of the Milkweed Leaf-Miner fly, which bore holes in the leaves. Bears a very fragrant pink flower, Prairie Milkweed makes a nice addition to any sunny medium to medium-moist garden. After just a few years the taproot will extend very deep, protecting the plant in times of drought, but also making it difficult to move so choose your spot wisely.
Asclepias sullivantii

Asclepias syriaca

Milkweed, Common
This native classic is best known as a food of larval monarch butterflies (along with its siblings A. incarnata and A. tuberosa). Robust and stoloniferous with deep pink clusters of fragrant flowers in June and July, followed by lovely pods of silky seeds in October.Monarch butterflies lay their eggs exclusively on Milkweed plants, making them the sole food source for their larvae. Once found in abundance in nearly every farm field, ditch, and disturbed site, Common Milkweed numbers have been in dramatic decline in recent years, due in part to suburban development and the increased efficiency of herbicides used in conjunction with herbicide-tolerant, genetically modified row crops. Common Milkweed is one of the easiest and fastest to establish of the Milkweeds. The large flower can vary in the color range from nearly white to deep pink-purple. The fragrance is very delicate and pleasing and numerous native pollinators will benefit during its long bloom time.
Asclepias syriaca

Asclepias tuberosa

Milkweed, Butterfly
Abundance of bright orange flowers June through August. Host plant for the monarch butterfly and a superior nectar plant for many other butterfly species. Requires well-drained soil.
Asclepias tuberosa

Asclepias verticillata

Milkweed, Whorled
A widely adaptable and tough native is a deer-resistant food for larval butterflies. The fine-textured foliage provides a dark green backdrop for the clusters of white flowers that appear in June and July. Please note, Asclepias verticillata is highly toxic to livestock and horses - it should not be allowed to take root in pastures or hayfields. Found in dry fields, roadsides and shale barrens, you can see that it needs no coddling. Best located in a sunny dry spot, but will tolerate average to moist garden soil as well.
Asclepias verticillata

Asclepias viridis

Milkweed, Spider
Green Milkweed shares with other Asclepias species its milky, irritating sap and strong attractiveness to Monarch butterflies and a host of other insects. Very tolerant of dry conditions, it is also called Green Antelopehorn. Green Milkweed features rose-white flowers surrounded by green that form in showy umbellated clusters, often one per plant. Its beauty and tendency to spread slightly make it a good garden choice. White crab spider lives on this plant.
Asclepias viridis

Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) laevis

Aster, Smooth
Small violet blue to purple flowers with yellow center appear in open, loose clusters in September and October. Foliage is bluish-green. Easy to grow. Midwest native. AKA Symphyotrichum laeve.
Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) laevis

Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) novae-angliae

Aster, New England
Blooms August and September. AKA Symphyotrichum novae-angliae.
Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) novae-angliae

Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'

Aster, New England
Heavy blooming with deep purple flowers late July or early August and continuing through September and October. Densely compact mounded growth habit. While this plant may appear leggy in a container on the retail shelf, Purple Dome exhibits outstanding landscape performance and still offers the richest purple flower among all Asters. AKA Symphyotrichum novae-angliae.
Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'

Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) oblongifolius

Aster, Aromatic
A charming native with masses of blue-purple daisy like flowers blooming July through frost. Blue-green foliage forms tidy, compact, self-supporting mound and is aromatic when crushed. Neat, dome-shaped habit. AKA Symphyotrichum oblongifolium.
Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) oblongifolius

Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) oolentangiensis

Aster, Sky Blue
Dozens of blue flowers with yellow centers bloom in September and October. The foliage is blue-green and stems are dark. Butterflies love the nectar. AKA Symphyotrichum oolentangiense.
Aster (syn Symphyotrichum) oolentangiensis

Athyrium filix-femina

Fern, Lady
Bright green, lacy fronds arise from creeping rhizomes. Clumps are dense and upright. Vigorous and easy to grow.
Athyrium filix-femina

Athyrium filix-femina 'Lady in Red'

Fern, Lady
Vibrant burgundy stems stand out against light green lacy fronds. Foliage is upright and arching. Naturalizes by creeping rhizomes.
Athyrium filix-femina 'Lady in Red'

Baptisia alba (syn. B. leucantha)

Indigo, False
White flowers with black stems in May into early June. Slightly weeping habit. Native.
Baptisia alba (syn. B. leucantha)

Baptisia australis

Indigo, False
Baptisia australis

Bouteloua curtipendula

Grass, Sideoats Grama
Narrow leaves form compact clumps that turn an attractive gold in autumn with interesting reddish orange flowers and seed heads that are carried to one side of the stem. Attractive to birds and very drought tolerant.
Bouteloua curtipendula

Bouteloua curtipendula

Grass, Sideoats Grama
Bouteloua curtipendula

Bouteloua gracilis

Grass, Blue Grama
Bouteloua gracilis

Bouteloua gracilis 'Blonde Ambition'

Grass, Blue Grama
Where low maintenance meets garden whimsy, 'Blonde Ambition' is sure to turn heads. Airy, chartreuse flowers float horizontally amidst blue-green foliage from mid-summer into fall. Seed heads extend the season providing unique winter appeal. Extremely cold hardy and adaptable to various soil types, use in sweeps for a dramatic effect. Unlike any other ornamental grass in cultivation, discovered and introduced by David Salman of High Country Gardens.
Bouteloua gracilis 'Blonde Ambition'

Callirhoe bushii

Poppy Mallow, Bush'S
Cup shaped magenta flowers bloom June through August. Rambling flower stems are more erect than those of the similar C. inbolucrata. Long tap root provides good drought tolerance buts makes transplanting of established plants more difficult.
Callirhoe bushii

Callirhoe involucrata

Poppy Mallow, Purple
Showy, cup-shaped magenta flowers bloom June through frost. Foliage forms trailing stems that forms excellent ground cover or hangs over walls. Drought tolerant.
Callirhoe involucrata

Carex albicans

Sedge, Whitetinge
Carex albicans

Carex amphibola

Sedge, Creek
Compact, clump forming sedge with shiny, semi-evergreen foliage. Vigorous grower. Widely adaptable, preferring dry to moderate moisture conditions. A Midwest native.
Carex amphibola

Carex annectens

Sedge, Yellow Fruited
Missouri Native sedge with attractive yellow flower spikelet's and compact tufts of fine foliage. Flowers form in May, seeds in June. aka C. brachyglossa
Carex annectens

Carex bicknellii

Sedge, Bicknell'S
Carex bicknellii can be found in North America from Eastern half of Canada and south to Kansas. It grows in dry and moist prairies, open woodlands and rocky areas. This Carex tolerates dry locations better than many sedges. It is useful for rain gardens, meadows, and areas where drought-tolerant plants are required. Bicknell’s Sedge grows in tufts of green, narrow, grasslike foliage and spreads by rhizomes. Copper-colored, oval-shaped seedheads appear in late spring giving it one of its common names. Carex bicknellii is named in honor of Eugene Pintard Bicknell (1859-1925), who is known for his keen observations of plant and animal life.
Carex bicknellii

Carex brevior

Sedge, Shortbeak
A common sedge able to grow almost anywhere, most often found in the wild in dry, disturbed areas. Also called Plains Oval Sedge, Shortbeak Sedge actively grows during the spring and fall when soil temperatures are cool like most sedges (cool-season growers). In summer triangular leafy stems rise above low tufts of narrow grass-like foliage. The culms bear prickly green oval spikelets that transition into golden brown seed clusters.Leaf blades are usually about 1’ long and 1/8” wide. The leaf sheaths at the base of each blade has an unusual whitish color and an almost glassy appearance. In late spring multiple leafy culms rise above the foliage to 3-4’. Each culm bears 2-6 oval flower spikes. Each green spikes contain upper pistillate and lower staminate florets. The spikelets are tapered at the base and bluntly pointed at the tip. The flowers transition into reddish brown summer seed spikes. Plants are 1-4’ tall with an equal spread.
Carex brevior

Carex eburnea

Sedge, Bristle-Leaved
Soft, thread-like, green foliage forms a spherical clump. Insignificant whitish-green flowers in April. Occurs naturally in limestone outcrops but also tolerates acid conditions.
Carex eburnea

Carex flaccosperma

Sedge, Blue Wood
Evergreen sedge forms attractive clumps of narrow, blue-green leaves. Thrives in moist conditions but will tolerate drought. An American native groundcover for shade. Greenish-white flower is insignificant.
Carex flaccosperma

Carex frankii

Sedge, Frank'S
Hardy grass-like plant with green foliage. Bristle-like, brown seed heads in May to September. Native to floodplain woodlands. AKA Bristly Cattail Sedge.
Carex frankii

Carex grayi

Sedge, Bur
Attractive, evergreen pleated foliage is lime green in full sun and dark green in part shade. Spiked flowers in May form star-like seed heads. A Midwest native.
Carex grayi

Carex muskingumensis

Sedge, Palm
A dense, clump-forming sedge which is grown for its foliage effect. Produces rigid, erect stems to 20" tall with 8" long, pointed, grass-like, light green leaves radiating from the stem tops. Commonly called palm sedge since the leaves somewhat superficially resemble miniature palm fronds. A Missouri native which is found most often in wooded swamps and on wooded flood plains of rivers. Spread by rhizomes and self-seeding. Insignificant flowers appear in May on terminal spikes which are not showy but are noticeable and of some interest and persist throughout the summer. Foliage promptly turns yellow after frost. Species is named for the Muskingum River in Ohio.
Carex muskingumensis

Carex pensylvanica

Sedge, Pennsylvania
A compact sedge with arching, semi-evergreen, fine-texture foliage. An excellent shade to part shade groundcover. Tolerant of tough urban conditions, especially under trees. An American native.
Carex pensylvanica

Carex radiata

Sedge, Straight-Styled Wood
Fine textured, grass-like, medium green foliage forms a tidy clump. A drought tolerant groundcover for shady sites. A Midwest native.
Carex radiata

Carex shortiana

Sedge, Short'S
Carex shortiana

Carex stricta

Sedge, Tussock
A wetland native that grows in 2-3' tall clumps about 2' wide. As old leaves die, they build up around the living plant, making a "tussock" or little hill. It grows in or near water and spreads by rhizomes.
Carex stricta

Carex vulpinoidea

Sedge, Fox
Missouri native sedge grows on moist open ground in swamps, wet prairies or near water, is one of the most abundant sedges in the state. Foliage consist of narrow grass-like leaf blades. The seed heads, which spray out attractively from the center of the clump, resemble a fox's tail but are short-lived.
Carex vulpinoidea

Cephalanthus occidentalis

Buttonbush
Blooms late June or July.
Cephalanthus occidentalis

Chasmanthium (syn Uniola) latifolium

Grass, Northern River Oats
Upright clumps of bamboo-like foliage. Green foliage turns copper in fall and brown in winter. Attractive flat flower spikes hang down from flowering stems. Prefers light shade and damp locations. Can self-sow.
Chasmanthium (syn Uniola) latifolium

Chelone glabra

Turtlehead
White spike flowers with a tinge of pink appear August through October. Flowers look like a turtle's head. Deep green foliage on upright stems looks good all season. A Midwest native.
Chelone glabra

Conoclinium coelestinum

Mist Flower (Wild Ageratum)
Blooms September through October. (FKA Eupatorium coelestinum)
Conoclinium coelestinum

Coreopsis lanceolata

Coreopsis, Lance-Leaf
Showy, single, gold-yellow flowers on tall stems in May and June.
Coreopsis lanceolata

Coreopsis palmata

Coreopsis, Prairie
Pale yellow flowers--much softer in color than those of our other native coreopsis--are carried on stiff, upright stems for several weeks, beginning in late spring. Spreads by rhizomes and seed, eventually forming large colonies.
Coreopsis palmata

Coreopsis tripteris

Coreopsis, Tall
Coreopsis tripteris

Dalea (syn Petalosteum) purpurea

Clover, Purple Prairie
A native Missouri prairie clover which occurs in glades, rocky open woods and prairies in much of the state. It features tiny purple flowers in dense, cone-like heads atop erect, wiry stems late June through September.
Dalea (syn Petalosteum) purpurea

Deschampsia cespitosa 'Goldtau'

Hairgrass, Tufted
This lovely cultivar of Deschampsia cespitosa shares many attributes with the species: clump growing, semi evergreen, fine textured leaves, and thin stems topped with sprays of airy delicate flowers. However, Deschampsia cespitosa ‘Goldtau’ has yellowish seeds heads that turn golden in the fall and provide wonderful winter interest. Deschampsia cespitosa performs best and flowers most in cooler climates. In warmer climates, Golden Dew Tufted Hair Grass needs semi-shade and moist conditions.
Deschampsia cespitosa 'Goldtau'

Diarrhena obovata

Beakgrain, American
Diarrhena obovata

Dicentra eximia

Bleeding Heart, Fringed
Pink flowers on arching stems over blue-gray, fernlike foliage. Flowers bloom from spring through early summer and will continue through fall with adequate moisture. Foliage lasts through the whole season.
Dicentra eximia

Dryopteris intermedia

Fern, Fancy Wood
Dryopteris intermedia is a wonderful North American native evergreen fern that can be found in mountainous regions from Canada south to Alabama. The 2' long fronds make an 18" tall x 3' wide clump that grows best in moist woodland locations, where it has a slight preference for alkaline soils. Research has shown Dryopteris intermedia to be overly promiscuous, having fathered offspring with at least eight other wood ferns...creating quite a taxonomic and legal tangle as you can imagine.
Dryopteris intermedia

Dryopteris marginalis

Fern, Eastern Wood
Tough, adaptable evergreen fern with olive green arching fronds that grow in a vase shape. Established plants are reasonably drought tolerant. The leathery leaves of Dryopteris marginalis are a beautiful addition to the woodland garden and can form a lovely an easy to maintain groundcover. A sturdy east coast native, it forms a tidy clump that will not spread and is very tolerant of dry shade conditions once it has established. Marginal wood fern is often found in shaded crevices of rocky ledges and bluffs from Newfoundland to Georgia, west to Oklahoma and Minnesota.
Dryopteris marginalis

Echinacea pallida

Coneflower, Pale
Tall bare stems are topped by flowers with narrow, strap-like pink-purple petals. Tolerates very dry soil.
Echinacea pallida

Echinacea paradoxa

Coneflower, Yellow
Each flower stem produces a single bloom with yellow ray petals around a brown cone-shaped seed head. A very drought tolerant Midwest native.
Echinacea paradoxa

Echinacea purpurea

Coneflower, Purple
Rosy purple flowers with non-drooping petals. A Midwest native.
Echinacea purpurea

Echinacea purpurea 'RUBY STAR Rubinstern'

Coneflower
Large carmine-red to purple flowers bloom June to August. Seed heads attract finches and other songbirds. Tolerant of drought, heat, humidity and poor soils. Said to be an improvement over `Magnus'.
Echinacea purpurea 'RUBY STAR Rubinstern'

Elymus canadensis

Grass, Canada Wild Rye
Elymus canadensis

Equisetum hyemale

Rush, Horsetail
Bamboo-like, dark green stems are rigid, rough and hollow. Evergreen stems provide winter interest in water and bog gardens or in a low wet spot. Can be aggressive.
Equisetum hyemale

Eryngium yuccifolium

Rattlesnake Master
Clusters of round, greenish white flower heads June through September on sword shaped, medium green foliage. Distinctive plant is an interesting cut flower. A drought-tolerant Midwest native.
Eryngium yuccifolium

Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe'

Joe Pye Weed
A compact Joe Pye Weed that needs no staking. Flowers are produced in the usual dome-shaped clusters. Mauve-purple flowers on dark purple stems and green foliage July through September. Butterfly magnet. An outstanding, underutilized shrub-like perennial. More tolerant of light shade that other E. purpureum.
Eupatorium dubium 'Little Joe'

Eupatorium maculatum

Joe-Pye Weed
Joe-Pye Weeds are bold, architectural specimen plants, perfect for making a statement in the border. Plants forms a huge clump of coarse green leaves, bearing enormous umbrella-like heads of rosy-purple flowers in late summer. Eupatorium maculatum is perfect for planting in damp soil in marshy areas, along streambanks, and on pond edges. Joe Pye Weed (also called Spotted Joe Pye Weed) also thrives in rich garden soil.
Eupatorium maculatum

Eupatorium purpureum

Joe Pye Weed
Eupatorium purpureum

Fragaria virginica

Strawberry, Wild
Virginia strawberry or wild strawberry is a ground-hugging plant rising from a fibrous, perennial root system. Hairy leaf petioles, up to 6 in. long, each bear a single trifoliate leaf. The hairy flower stalk gives rise to a loose cluster of small, five-petaled flowers followed by tasty, wild strawberries. Found in patches in fields and dry openings, this plant produces the finest, sweetest, wild strawberry.
Fragaria virginica

Helianthus occidentalis

Sunflower, Western
Helianthus occidentalis

Heliopsis helianthoides

Sunflower, Ox-Eye
Golden yellow daisy-like flowers bloom for weeks in summer and make good cut flowers. Seed heads are attractive to songbirds. Pinch for shorter, bushier plants.
Heliopsis helianthoides

Heliopsis helianthoides 'Sunstruck'

Sunflower, False
ariegated Heliopsis have long been popular in the perennial landscape, and ‘Sunstruck’ fills the spaces at a much shorter height. 2” large, golden yellow flowers appear above the cream and green variegated foliage even earlier than typical Heliopsis, and blooms all through summer until fall. Compared to ‘Loraine Sunshine’, ‘Sunstruck’ is more compact, has more ray florets and a deeper flower color.
Heliopsis helianthoides 'Sunstruck'

Heuchera 'Appletini'

Coral Bells
Continuing the trend of bringing flower performance back to Coral Bells, ‘Appletini’ is the perfect combination of lime foliage and red flowers. Medium sized, lime green leaves have a silver overlay that makes the foliage truly attractive. Its best feature is arguably its stunning flower color: dark rose red stems hold rich ruby red flowers, starting in early summer. This plant occasionally reblooms into fall. The bright foliage is the perfect addition to a perennial combination container or the front of the border. Coral bells are easy to grow and blend easily with most other perennials in the landscape. Because of their low, mounding habit, they are often used as edging along paths or in containers. Try cutting a few of the tall flower scapes for fresh bouquets.
Heuchera 'Appletini'

Heuchera 'Pretty Pistachio'

Coral Bells
Starting in spring, 4.5in wide leaves are chartreuse and mellow to lime green in summer. Huge, 5"wide clusters of medium pink flowers are produced continuously starting in midsummer and going until early fall. Flowers dry on the stems to a lovely raspberry color, extending the attractiveness of the plant. This plant preforms best in filtered sun, as too much sun will bleach the brightly colored leaves. Coral bells are easy to grow and blend easily with most other perennials in the landscape. Because of their low, mounding habit, they are often used as edging along paths or in containers. Try cutting a few of the tall flower scapes for fresh bouquets.
Heuchera 'Pretty Pistachio'

Heuchera richardsonii

Alum Root
Clump forming green foliage forms rounded mound. New foliage has some white mottling or purple blush. Tiny, greenish flowers on slender stems 18-24" above foliage in May and June. Very winter hardy.
Heuchera richardsonii

Hibiscus 'Vintage Wine'

Hibiscus, Hardy
Near-black buds open to huge 7", scarlet red flowers that shimmer in the sun with a darker red eye. The overlapping petals of ‘Vintage Wine’ have a crinkled texture and open completely with minimal cupping. Flowers are produced from the top to the bottom of the plant, rather than only at the top like some older cultivars. Dark green, heart-shaped leaves form a densely upright, columnar clump. Use this incredibly dense variety as a focal point in your sun garden. ‘Vintage Wine’ differs from ‘Cranberry Crush’ with the shape of its leaves, the tone of flower color (a warmer red), and the density of its plant habit.
Hibiscus 'Vintage Wine'

Hibiscus lasiocarpus

Hibiscus, Rose Mallow
White or pink flowers with red centers grow 4 to 5 in. across. Flowers open for many weeks in July through October.. Large fuzzy leaves and a shrublike form give this plant substantial bulk in the landscape. Plants generally break dormancy late in spring so be patient. Tolerates some shade but flower production is best in full sun. Tolerates heat and humidity.
Hibiscus lasiocarpus

Hydrangea arborescens

Hydrangea
Hydrangea arborescens

Iris cristata

Iris, Dwarf Crested
Clouds of pretty blue flowers float just above the foliage for two weeks in April or May. Unlike many iris, the foliage is handsome all through summer. Nice edging plant for the front of a shaded garden or path. Also a good slow moving ground cover.
Iris cristata

Iris fulva

Iris, Copper
Unusual copper color flower is a beardless variety native to swamps and wetlands. Flowers appear in May and June on tall scapes. Bright green foliage is sword shaped. Pollinated by hummingbirds.
Iris fulva

Iris versicolor

Iris, Northern Blue Flag
Iris versicolor

Iris virginica var. shrevei

Iris, Southern Blue Flag
This moisture-loving iris has fragrant, blue violet flowers with falls crested in yellow and white. Narrow, bright green leaves often lie on the ground or in water.
Iris virginica var. shrevei

Juncus effusus

Rush, Soft
A native clump-forming wetland plant with dark green soft, round stems. An effective foliage accent for pools, ponds and stream sides. Will grow in shallow water or bogs. Foliage turns yellow in fall before turning brown. Insignificant golden flowers June through August. Attracts songbirds.
Juncus effusus

Juncus tenuis

Rush, Poverty
Juncus tenuis

Koeleria macrantha

Grass, June
Koeleria macrantha

Liatris spicata

Blazing Star
Deep purple flower spikes in July and August on erect, grass-like stems. Tolerant of drought, heat and humidity. Attracts songbirds.
Liatris spicata

Lobelia cardinalis

Cardinal Flower
Lobelia cardinalis

Lobelia siphilitica

Lobelia, Blue
Stout spikes of two-lipped blue flowers bloom in September and October. Excellent for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. Great lobelia is a Missouri native perennial which typically grows in moist to wet locations along streams, sloughs, springs, swamps, meadows and in low wooded areas. May self-seed in optimum growing conditions, forming attractive colonies.
Lobelia siphilitica

Matteuccia struthiopteris

Fern, Ostrich
One of the largest and most popular perennial ferns. Dark green fronds are shaped like ostrich plumes. Clump forming, upright to arching habit. Rapid spreader requiring space to grow. Good ground cover that spreads rapidly in moist areas.
Matteuccia struthiopteris

Mimulus ringens

Monkey Flower, Allegehny
Lilac-purple snapdragon-like flowers appear in pairs June through September. Upright foliage is bright green. Native to swampy areas, wet meadows and low woods. Spreads by creeping rhizomes.
Mimulus ringens

Monarda bradburyana

Bergamot, Wild
Monarda bradburyana

Monarda fistulosa

Bergamot, Wild
Spidery pompons of lavender blossoms are irresistible to butterflies and hummingbirds, and the fragrant gray-green foliage is wonderful in a scent garden or herb garden. Provide good air circulation to minimize powdery mildew, and deadhead to prolong flowering.
Monarda fistulosa

Monarda x didyma 'Blue Moon'

Bee Balm
Lavender blue flowers are held by attractive purple bracts.A breakthrough, shorter height for this color.The members of the SUGAR BUZZ® Series from the Walters Gardens, Inc. hybridizing program are perfectly suited to the middle of the flower border at 16-24" tall. All members in this series are similar in size, bloom time, and vigor, making it easy for growers to offer the entire series. In midsummer, they form a solid dome of color with their 2-2.5" flowers on strong, well-branched stems. The dark green foliage forms an upright clump with enough vigor to quickly fill out containers nicely but are not aggressive in the garden. As with all Monardas from the Walters Gardens, Inc. hybridizing program, these display above average resistance to powdery mildew.
Monarda x didyma 'Blue Moon'

Monarda x didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Bee Balm
Large bright red flower clusters appear July through September. Upright, mildew resistant, fragrant foliage can be used to flavor tea. Attracts hummingbirds.
Monarda x didyma 'Jacob Cline'

Oenothera macrocarpa (syn missouriensis)

Sundrops, Ozark
Large yellow flowers, up to 4" across, are mildly fragrant. Plants trail and look good in a rock garden. Plants tolerate poor soil and drought but need good drainage. (syn. O. missouriensis)
Oenothera macrocarpa (syn missouriensis)

Onoclea sensibilis

Fern, Sensitive
Large somewhat course textured foliage is bright green. Fertile fronds turn dark brown and roll up. Native to wet woods and moist soils along streams. Sensitive to frost and drought. Fast-creeping rhizomes produce a carpet of light green fronds. A tough fern that thrives in moist soil. Plants die down at the first hint of frost but ornamental fertile fronds remain. These can be used in dried arrangements.
Onoclea sensibilis

Osmunda cinnamomea

Fern, Cinnamon
Osmunda cinnamomea

Osmunda claytoniana

Fern, Interrupted
Fruiting bodies are produced on the lower portion of the fronds in between the pinnae (leaf blades), giving this distinctive fern its name. In spring, the newly emerging silvery-white "fiddleheads" are striking in appearance. Interrupted Fern (Osmunda claytoniana) does best in moderately damp acid soils, but adapts well to almost any good garden soil in part to full shade.
Osmunda claytoniana

Osmunda regalis

Fern, Royal
Mature fronds are lance-shaped and light green and grow in a vase shape. The fronds resemble leaves from plants in the legume family such as a locust tree. Spreads slowly.
Osmunda regalis

Panicum virgatum 'Heavy Metal'

Grass, Switch
Panicum virgatum 'Heavy Metal'

Panicum virgatum 'Northwind'

Grass, Switch
Panicum virgatum 'Northwind'

Panicum virgatum 'Prairie Sky'

Grass, Switch
Similar to 'Heavy Metal' but with bluer leaves and a more arching habit.
Panicum virgatum 'Prairie Sky'

Panicum virgatum 'Shenandoah'

Grass, Switch
Panicum virgatum 'Shenandoah'

Parthenium integrifolium

Quinine, Wild
Clump-forming, Missouri native perennial which occurs in dry soils on prairies, glades and rocky woods. Grows 3-4' tall. Woolly-looking, white flower headsMay to august. Leaves are aromatic, toothed and rough. Former medicinal use as a diuretic. Also called American Feverfew.
Parthenium integrifolium

Penstemon cobaea

Dew Flower
Penstemon cobaea

Penstemon digitalis

Penstemon, Foxglove
Clump-forming, Missouri-native perennial typically occurs in prairies, fields, wood margins, open woods and along railroad tracks. Abundant plumes of tubular white flowers provide nectar for hummingbirds April through June. Attractive seed heads and reddish fall color extend seasonal interest. Attracts songbirds.
Penstemon digitalis

Penstemon digitalis 'Blackbeard'

Beardtongue
Dark purple flower stems hold its lilac purple flowers with their white flaring tubes high above the low mound of deep eggplant purple leaves. Attractive dark burgundy seed pods follow the flowering performance for extended seasonal interest. ‘Blackbeard’ stays strictly upright all season long. It takes the heat and humidity in stride but is also very cold hardy. It continues to provide terrific color in the landscape all season long.
Penstemon digitalis 'Blackbeard'

Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red'

Penstemon, Foxglove
Foliage emerges purple-bronze and matures to green. Profusion of white flowers on wiry stems. Grows best in full sun and moist soil. [PPA-1996]
Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red'

Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon'

Phlox, Woodland
Violet-blue, fragrant flowers bloom in April and May. Puts on quite a show when in blooms. A long lived, carefree native groundcover.
Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon'

Phlox divaricata var. laphammi

Phlox, Woodland
Phlox divaricata var. laphammi

Phlox paniculata

Phlox, Meadow
Phlox paniculata

Physocarpus opulifolius

Ninebark
Physocarpus opulifolius

Physostegia virginiana 'Miss Manners'

Obedient Plant
Physostegia virginiana 'Miss Manners'

Polemonium reptans

Jacob'S Ladder
Polemonium reptans

Polystichum acrostichoides

Fern, Christmas
Glossy, dark green foliage is evergreen. Fronds emerge upright, arching as they mature to cover ground. Drought tolerant once established. Tiny leaves resemble Christmas stockings.
Polystichum acrostichoides

Pontedaria cordata

Pickeral Weed
Pontedaria cordata

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium

Mint, Slender Mountain
Pycnanthemum tenuifolium

Ratibida pinnata

Coneflower, Grey Headed
Large yellow flowers with drooping petals surround a brown seed head. Plants bloom profusely all summer. Birds eat the seed if old flowers are left on the plant.
Ratibida pinnata

Rudbeckia fulgida

Coneflower, Orange
Masses of golden daisies from mid to late summer on long-lived, adaptable plants. Equally useful in a flower border or prairie meadow.
Rudbeckia fulgida

Rudbeckia missouriensis

Black-Eyed Susan, Missouri
This native is loaded with gold flowers with brown centers for several weeks in summer.
Rudbeckia missouriensis

Rudbeckia subtomentosa

Coneflower, Sweet
Lovely, butter yellow daisies, each 3” across, decorate large, well-branched plants. Foliage is an attractive gray-green. For more compact plants, pinch lightly in spring.
Rudbeckia subtomentosa

Ruellia humilis

Petunia, Hairy Wild
Wild petunia is a Missouri native perennial which occurs in dryish soils in open woods, glades, prairies and fields throughout the State except for the far southeastern lowlands. Charming, low growing clumps produce light purple tubular flowers from May to Oct. The flowers arise in groups at the leaf axis. The square stems and the leaves are both quite hairy-a natural defense against dry conditions.
Ruellia humilis

Salvia azurea

Sage, Blue
Salvia azurea

Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium

Grass, Little Bluestem
Green to blue-green leaves turn deep red in the fall. One of our native prairie grasses that is perfectly suited to hot humid summers.
Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium

Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium 'Blaze'

Grass, Little Bluestem
Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium 'Blaze'

Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium 'Blue Heaven'

Grass, Little Bluestem
Tall, upright form with beautiful blue-grey foliage that turns to burgundy red with purple and violet highlights in fall. The fall color lasts well into November. Small, fluffy white flowers form in late summer.
Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium 'Blue Heaven'

Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium 'Prairie Blues'

Grass, Little Bluestem
An improved selection of the native bluestem. It offers striking gray-blue, upright foliage that takes on reddish-orange tones in the fall. Fluffy silver seed heads from late summer well into fall.
Schizachyrium (syn Andropogon) scoparium 'Prairie Blues'

Sedum ternatum

Stonecrop, Woodland
Blooms late April through May.
Sedum ternatum

Senecio (syn Packera) obovatus

Squaw-Weed
Senecio (syn Packera) obovatus

Sisyrinchium angustifolium 'Lucerne'

Grass, Blue-Eyed
Bright blue star shaped flowers with gold centers rise above fine, Iris-like foliage from late April or early May until July. Excellent for edging.
Sisyrinchium angustifolium 'Lucerne'

Solidago drummondii

Goldenrod, Cliff
Graceful, arching stems are crowded with tiny, bright yellow, daisy like flowers in late summer to fall. Flowers attract butterflies and other pollinators. Basal leaves generally dry up and disappear by flowering time but leaves toward the top of stems remain. Plant Cliff Goldenrod where it can hang over a rock wall for a be
Solidago drummondii

Solidago flexicaulis

Goldenrod, Zigazg
Solidago flexicaulis

Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'

Goldenrod
Impressive, lacy sprays of golden yellow flowers in September and October. Flower clusters radiate out in all directions and resemble fireworks on arching bushy foliage. Basal foliage is evergreen. Extremely drought tolerant, as exhibited at Alwerdt's Gardens in Altamont, Il during the summer 2002 drought.
Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'

Solidago speciosa

Goldenrod, Showy
Dense, erect clusters of bright yellow flowers top tall reddish stems in late summer and early fall. "Speciosa" is Latin for "showy," and this goldenrod certainly fits that bill. Clump forming.
Solidago speciosa

Sorghastrum nutans

Grass, Indian
Upright clumps of slender, blue-green leaves turn golden yellow in fall. Stiff, vertical flowering stems, topped with 12" long, narrow, light brown flower panicles with yellow stamens, rise well above the foliage in late summer.
Sorghastrum nutans

Spartina pectinata

Grass, Prairie Cordgrass
Spartina pectinata

Spigelia marilandica

Indian Pink
Indian pink is a clump-forming, Missouri native perennial which occurs in moist woods and streambanks in the far southeastern part of the State. Features one-sided cymes of upward facing, trumpet-shaped, red flowers (to 2" long) atop stiff stems growing to 18" tall. Each flower is yellow inside and flares at the top to form five pointed lobes (a yellow star). Flowers bloom in June. Glossy green, ovate to lance-shaped leaves (to 4" long).
Spigelia marilandica

Sporobolus heterolepis

Grass, Prairie Dropseed
Fine textured tufts of green foliage turn gold or deep orange in autumn. Pink flowers appear in August with fragrant seeds. Heat and drought tolerant. Attracts songbirds and wildlife.
Sporobolus heterolepis

Stylophorum diphyllum

Poppy, Celandine
Blooms April through June and frequently into July.
Stylophorum diphyllum

Tradescantia 'Charlotte's Web'

Spiderwort
Finally—a gold foliage Spiderwort that doesn’t burn in sun! Its grass-like leaves emerge in spring with a thin red margin on the edges of each leaf blade. The chartreuse foliage transitions to gold with more sun exposure. Small, three-petaled soft blue flowers cover the arching, bushy clumping habit. Like most Tradescantia of its type, flowers will open in the morning and close in the afternoon on sunny days. They may remain open on cloudy days. This easy care perennial is an excellent choice for gardeners looking for low maintenance or native perennials. It's no wonder this great performer was selected as a Proven Winner.
Tradescantia 'Charlotte's Web'

Tradescantia ohiensis

Spiderwort, Ohio
Showy clusters of blue or rose flowers bloom on erect stems late May to early July. Each flower opens for one day. Cut back to 6-12" in mid summer to encourage new growth and possible fall bloom.
Tradescantia ohiensis

Verbena hastata

Vervain, American Blue
Numerous purplish-blue flowers on pencil-like spikes bloom July through September. Stiff and upright habit. Flowers bloom from bottom to top, a few at a time. A Midwest native enjoying wet soils.
Verbena hastata

Verbena (syn Glandularia) canadensis

Verbena, Rose
Lilac rose flowers are very attractive to butterflies. Plants bloom April through September. Low growing foliage makes a good ground cover. Not reliably hardy when associated with heavy, wet soil conditions during the winter months; best treated as an annual.
Verbena (syn Glandularia) canadensis

Vernonia arkansana

Ironweed, Curlytop
Blooms August through September.
Vernonia arkansana

Vernonia fasciculata

Ironweed, Dwarf
Small purple flowers from August through September. This is a very durable, naturally short growing specie.
Vernonia fasciculata

Vernonia lettermannii

Iron Butterfly
Blooms August through September.
Vernonia lettermannii

Vernonia noveboracensis

Ironweed
Blooms August through September.
Vernonia noveboracensis

Veronicastrum virginicum

Culver'S Root
Blooms June through August.
Veronicastrum virginicum

Waldsteinia fragarioides

Strawberry, Barren
Strawberry-like plant with yellow flower in April and May. Mat forming green foliage spreads by runner-like -rhizomes. Small red fruits are inedible.
Waldsteinia fragarioides

Zizia aptera

Golden Alexanders
The thick, glossy semi-evergreen foliage looks a little like Lenten Rose and provides nice contrast to other native plants. Small yellow flowers in flat heads bloom May-June.
Zizia aptera

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